In a rule change that was effective April 8, 2022, but communicated on April 11, 2022 the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) expanded coverage of export controls on Russia and Belarus to include any item with an Export Control Classification Number (ECCN).  Prior controls applied to items in Commerce Control List (CCL)

Today, by overwhelming margins, Congress passed two pieces of legislation to further punish Russia for its invasion of Ukraine. The bipartisan bills suspend Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR) with Russia and Belarus and codify President Biden’s recent Executive Order banning Russian energy imports. The bills now head to the President’s desk and are expected to

Today, the United States imposed broad new sanctions on Russia in response to the continuing conflict in Ukraine.  The new measures include full blocking sanctions on Sberbank and Alfa-Bank, two of the largest banks in Russia, a ban on new investment on any sector of the Russian economy, and blocking sanctions on additional Russian elites. 

On Friday, the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) added 120 parties operating in the Russian and Belarusian aerospace, maritime, and defense sectors to the Entity List.  BIS designated the parties for attempting to procure items subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) for the Russian and Belarusian militaries and for their military

Last week, President Biden invoked the Defense Production Act (“DPA”) to expand domestic production of certain critical minerals involved in the manufacture of large capacity batteries.  The five minerals specifically identified in the President’s memorandum are lithium, nickel, cobalt, graphite, and manganese.

The DPA allows the President to expedite and expand the supply of materials

Today, the United States imposed sanctions on Russian technology companies and a network of companies involved in procuring goods for the Russian Intelligence Services.  The Treasury Department also issued a determination authorizing the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) to impose sanctions on companies and individuals that it determines operate in the aerospace, electronics, or

Today, the United Kingdom expanded sanctions on Russia by imposing asset freeze restrictions on 59 Russian and six Belarusian actors.  The measures target key strategic industries in Russia, and include large banks, defense companies, and Russian elites.

Of note, the following Russian banks and companies have been added to the U.K.’s consolidated asset freeze list:

The pace of new Russia sanctions matters slowed this week, with most of the action coming out of the European Union and United Kingdom.  New measures this week included bans on imports of steel and iron products, exports of luxury goods, investments in the Russian energy sector, and dealings with oligarchs and Russian state-owned enterprises. 

Today, the European Union imposed another round of significant sanctions and trade controls on Russia in response to the crisis in Ukraine.  In addition to new asset freeze sanctions, the EU implemented a series of new trade restrictions on dealings with the Russian economy, including an import ban on Russian iron and steel products, a

Today, the United Kingdom imposed sanctions on more than 350 Russian individuals and entities, including Russian oligarchs, officials, elites, and their families.  Also targeted by the expanded UK asset freeze measures are Russian actors engaged in certain cyber activities and operations, including the proliferation of disinformation and propaganda.  These measures bring the United Kingdom’s Russia-related