The historic infrastructure bill, now approved by the U.S. Congress and pending President Biden’s signature, includes broad policy provisions designed to improve governmental sourcing from U.S. manufacturing sectors.  These new statutory authorities aim to:

  • Expand domestic preference procurement policies applicable to federal financial assistance programs for public works infrastructure;
  • Increase the domestic component content requirements

Today, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced an agreement reached with five countries – Austria, France, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom – on digital services tax (DST) measures that had been subject to recent investigations by USTR under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974.  These countries will avoid 25

On Monday, October 4, U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai delivered a long anticipated speech framing the Biden Administration’s trade policy toward China.

Among the announcements made were that (1) a Section 301 product exclusion process would be “restarted” with respect to the tariffs currently in effect, and (2) additional enforcement actions against China could be

Last Friday, the Office of Foreign Assets Control issued two general licenses aimed at facilitating humanitarian assistance and the provision of essential supplies to the people of Afghanistan.  Subject to exceptions, the general licenses establish blanket authorizations for transactions involving the Taliban or the Haqqani Network (and entities directly or indirectly owned by the same)

Last week, the Biden administration issued a new Executive Order (“E.O.”) that authorizes “menu-based” sanctions on persons determined to be responsible for or complicit in the ongoing crisis in northern Ethiopia, and announced a policy of denial for export licenses of military equipment to Ethiopia.  The two actions are aimed to stop the escalating conflict

On July 13, 2021, the U.S. Departments of Commerce, State, Treasury, Commerce and Homeland Security and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative issued an updated Advisory on supply-chain risks for U.S. businesses whose business activities may be implicated by human rights concerns related to forced labor in and outside of Xinjiang, China.

The updated

Yesterday, the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) sanctioned several Belarusian individuals and entities, including the State Security Committee of the Republic of Belarus (the Belarusian KGB), in response to the Lukashenka regime’s escalating violence and repression.  (The full list of changes to the Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) and Blocked Persons List is available

Yesterday, President Biden signed an Executive Order (“E.O.”) that formally revokes and replaces three earlier E.O.s that aimed to restrict transactions with TikTok, WeChat, and other communications and Fintech applications and provides a new framework to address security concerns related to the information and communications technology and services (“ICTS”) supply chain.  The new E.O. was

Yesterday morning, June 8, 2021, the Biden-Harris administration released a report including factual findings and recommendations concerning four critical supply chains.  The full 250-page report is available here and a White House fact sheet summarizing key findings and recommendations is available here.

The report stems from President Biden’s Executive Order 14017 (“EO 14017”), which

Yesterday, the Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) announced sanctions against three prominent Bulgarian individuals and 64 related companies for corruption.  The designations are the largest action in the history of Executive Order 13818, which implements the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act and authorizes sanctions on parties that engage in significant corruption or human