On July 10, USTR published a notice of action in the Section 301 investigation of France’s digital services tax announcing the imposition of additional 25 percent duties on certain products from France covering an estimated $1.3 billion of trade. The additional tariffs are effective January 6, 2021, pursuant to a 180-day suspension period.

A comprehensive

Comments Due by July 10, 2020

Today, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) published a Federal Register Notice seeking comments from interested parties to assist in its decisions on exclusions from the Section 232 tariffs and quotas imposed on imports of steel and aluminum articles.

Since issuing its interim final rule establishing the Section 232 exclusion request process, BIS has received over 179,000 exclusion requests (157,900 for steel and 21,100 for aluminum), with over 78,500 being granted and 25,400 being denied.

BIS is seeking public comment regarding “the appropriateness of the factors considered, and the efficiency and transparency of the process employed, in rendering decisions on requests for exclusions from the tariffs and quotas imposed on imports of steel and aluminum articles.”  The notice lists various topics for comments including but not limited to expanding or restricting eligibility requirements for requestors and objectors; the Section 232 Exclusions Portal; the factors considered in rendering decisions on exclusion requests; and the incorporation of steel and aluminum derivative products into the product exclusion process.
Continue Reading Commerce Department Seeks Comments on Section 232 Exclusion Process for Steel and Aluminum

Yesterday, the U.S. International Trade Commission (“USITC”) released a report on imports of products known to be related to the response to COVID-19.  The report was requested by Congressman Richard E. Neal, Chairman of the House Committee on Ways and Means and Senator Charles E. Grassley, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Finance in early

On Monday, April 20, 2020, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued interim instructions for implementation of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).*  The instructions provide guidance regarding preferential tariff claims under the USMCA.  The Agreement, once it enters into force, provides for the immediate or staged elimination of trade barriers for goods originating in one of the three countries.  The instructions provide guidance regarding rules of origin (including for automotive goods), regional value content (RCV) calculation methods, de minimis rules, transshipment, eligibility for textiles and apparel, making preference claims, and certification and recordkeeping rules and requirements.

The instructions provide a rules of origin definition to determine whether a good qualifies as an “originating good” under the USMCA, such that it is eligible for preferential tariff treatment.  Under USMCA a good is “originating” in the United States, Mexico, or Canada when:

a) The good is wholly obtained or produced entirely in the territory of one or more of the Parties, as defined in Article 4.3 of the Agreement;

b) The good is produced entirely in the territory of one or more of the Parties using non-originating materials provided the good satisfies all applicable requirements of product- specific rules of origin;

c) The good is produced entirely in the territory of one or more of the Parties exclusively from originating materials; or
Continue Reading CBP Posts Interim Instructions for USMCA Implementation

On February 27, 2020, President Trump announced that he would not impose duties on imports of titanium sponge pursuant to his authority under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, a statute that allows for the imposition of duties where imports threaten to impair the national security.  The decision was well-received by much

On Friday, January 24, 2020, President Trump issued a proclamation expanding duties imposed on steel and aluminum articles pursuant to Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act, commonly referred to as “Section 232 duties,” to certain downstream steel and aluminum “derivatives.”

Application of 232 duties to “derivative articles” is authorized by statute.  Indeed, while the

On January 15, 2019, President Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He signed the long-awaited “phase one” trade deal at the White House. The deal represents the first step towards a comprehensive agreement between the two nations and progress in the U.S.-China relationship. The deal will help ease trade tensions signaling a truce in the

Last week, the United States and China reached an agreement on the long-awaited “phase one” trade deal.  The deal, originally announced in October, will include tariff reductions by the United States and a $200 billion increase of U.S. good purchases by China. According to U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, the 86-page agreement is currently

On Tuesday, as “phase one” of the trade negotiations between the U.S. and China nears completion, the Wall Street Journal reported that the interim agreement would not only deter new tariffs, but lessen existing tariffs.  However, the “phase one” agreement reportedly will not include language regarding forced technology transfers.

China’s practice of forcing U.S. companies