Export Controls and Sanctions

Today the U.S. State Department published updated guidance indicating that significant transactions related to Nord Stream 2 and the second line of TukStream may be subject to U.S. secondary sanctions penalties under Section 232 of CAATSA.

Section 232 authorizes the U.S. government to impose a bevy of sanctions on non-U.S. parties that make investments in

Today the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced a settlement agreement with Amazon for apparent violations of U.S. sanctions regulations by the company. The announcement puts e-commerce and online companies on notice to increase their vigilance when it comes to sanctions screening.

According to OFAC, Amazon violated U.S. regulations by conducting retail e-commerce transactions

Today the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) announced that it is suspending license exceptions for exports, re-exports, or transfers to or within Hong Kong that provide differential treatment than license exceptions available for shipments to mainland China.  In other words, if a license exception is not available for shipments to China, then it can

Bureau of Industry and Security Issues Guidance on Rule

The new Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) rule prohibiting certain exports, reexports, and transfers of items to “military end-users” and “military end-uses” in China, Russia, and Venezuela is effective today.

The new rule creates additional due diligence burdens on manufacturers and exporters in the materials

On May 22, 2020, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) announced the addition of the following  businesses and a government institute to the agency’s Entity List in response to involvement in or support for human rights abuses related to the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region (XUAR):

  • China’s Ministry of Public Security’s Institute

The Department of State’s Office of Defense Trade Controls Policy announced that they are temporarily suspending, modifying, and excepting certain International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) requirements in an effort to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.  The temporary changes are as follows:

  • As of February 29, 2020, ITAR registrations and fees with an

On April 28, 2020, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry Security (“BIS”) published three separate rules which, in response to the Administration’s conclusion that “civil-military integration” in China is increasing, impose significant additional restrictions on the export of dual-use items to strategic rivals including China, Russia, and Venezuela.  These rules, when implemented, will have an especially acute effect on transactions with China.  Specifically, consistent with the Administration’s conclusion that these countries present national security and other foreign policy concerns, BIS restricted exports, re-exports, and in-country transfers to these destinations by: 1) issuing a final rule expanding end-use and end-user restrictions related to China by expanding the scope of prohibitions to include “military end-users” in China and expanding the definition of “military end use”,  among other changes; 2) issuing a final rule removing a license exception that allows the export of some items to certain countries that present national security concerns, including China and Russia, provided that the end-use was civilian (license exception CIV); and 3) issuing a proposed rule narrowing the scope of a license exception that allows the re-export of some items that present national security concerns (license exception APR).

These changes, which are largely effective on June 29, 2020, will create additional hurdles in transactions with China, Russia, and Venezuela. 
Continue Reading Bureau of Industry and Security Imposes Significant Additional Restrictions on Exports to China, Russia, and Venezuela

Our previous blog post listed the specific types of PPE respirators, masks, and gloves restricted for export from the U.S. on April 10, 2020 by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

On April 21, 2020, FEMA published a list of exemptions to those export restrictions which includes:

  • shipments to

On April 22, 2020, President Trump ordered Chevron to “wind down” its business in Venezuela by December 1, 2020. This will have a significant impact on companies that supply Chevron with equipment used for oil and gas projects in Venezuela that were previously licensed.

Effective April 21, 2020, the Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign