On August 14, the Commerce Department published a notice in the Federal Register announcing preliminary subsidy margins ranging from 16.56 to 80.97 percent in its countervailing duty investigation of certain aluminum foil from China.  The aluminum foil covered by Commerce’s investigation has a thickness of 0.2 mm or less, and is coiled in reels that

On August 10th, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) initiated its annual review of a program that extends duty-free treatment to producers in 120 designated developing countries and examines whether certain countries are doing enough to maintain their GSP eligibility because of country practices.  More specifically, the USTR announced its initiation of the 2017 Annual Generalized System of Preferences (“GSP”) Product and Country Practices Review in the August 11th Federal Register; see link here.
Continue Reading Get Your Duty-Free Here….The USTR initiates 2017 Annual GSP Review

According to a White House Statement issued on June 26th, President Donald Trump intends to nominate two important trade positions within the U.S. Department of Commerce (“Commerce”) and the International Trade Commission (“USITC”).

  • Peter B. Davidson, Senior Vice President for Congressional Relations at Verizon Communications, was selected by President Trump to be general counsel of Commerce.  Prior to Verizon, Mr. Davidson served as General Counsel to the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”).  He has also served as Vice President for Congressional Relations at USWEST and Qwest, and General Counsel and Policy Director to the Majority Leader of the House of Representatives.  Mr. Davidson earned his bachelor’s degree at Carleton College, and his law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law.
  • Jason Kearns was selected to be a Commissioner of the USITC for the remainder of a 9 year term expiring December 16, 2024.  Mr. Kearns currently serves as Chief International Trade Counsel (Democratic Staff) to the Committee on Ways and Means in the House of Representatives.  In this position, Mr. Kearns advises Members of Congress on legislation concerning trade and oversight issues involving the USTR and other agencies involved in international trade policy and regulation.  Before that, he served for three years in the Office of the General Counsel to the USTR.  From 2000 through 2003, Mr. Kearns worked in the international trade group of the law firm, WilmerHale.  Kearns has a master’s in public policy from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver.


Continue Reading Trump Announces Two Key Trade Nominations and WTO Taps U.S. Trade Attorney for Deputy Director-General Post

The American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016 (“AMCA”) established a new process for the submission and evaluation of requests for temporary duty suspensions and reductions.  Under the AMCA, petitions for duty suspensions and reductions are filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission (“Commission” or “USITC”), and the Commission, with input from other federal agencies, reviews each petition.  The Commission must submit preliminary and final reports to two Congressional committees (the House Committee on Ways and Means and the Senate Committee on Finance).  Following the final report’s submission, the Committees will draft a miscellaneous tariff bill (“MTB”).  Once the MTB passes, the temporary duty suspensions or reductions will be take effect for a period not to exceed three years. The process will repeat again in a second series, no later than October 15, 2019.

In the first series, over 3,100 petitions were submitted to the ITC through its online Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Petition System (“MTBPS”).  Due to petition withdrawals, 2,500 petitions still are under consideration.  On June 6, 2017, the Commission issued its preliminary report to the Committees, entitled:  American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016: Preliminary Report, USITC Pub. 4699 (USITC June 2017).  
Continue Reading It’s Time To Comment on Miscellaneous Tariff Petitions