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Yesterday morning, June 8, 2021, the Biden-Harris administration released a report including factual findings and recommendations concerning four critical supply chains.  The full 250-page report is available here and a White House fact sheet summarizing key findings and recommendations is available here.

The report stems from President Biden’s Executive Order 14017 (“EO 14017”), which

The United States International Trade Commission (“USITC”) has finalized recommended modifications to the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (“HTSUS”). The revisions, which are set to go into effect on January 1, 2022, conform the HTSUS with World Customs Organization (“WCO”) amendments to the Harmonized System commodity codes.  A detailed report of all changes

The United States Department of Agriculture (“USDA”) is now seeking comments from the public in connection with the Biden administration’s wide-ranging review of America’s supply chains.  USDA’s request is the first to address the administration’s year-long sectoral supply chain evaluations –  in this case agricultural commodities and food products.

Several agencies have already requested comments

Last Friday, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) issued lists of products from six countries that may be subject to additional 25 percent tariffs.  The proposed product lists identified by USTR are designed to offset digital services taxes (“DST”)[1] imposed by Austria, India, Italy, Spain, Turkey and the United Kingdom, and

As discussed earlier this month here, President Biden issued Executive Order 14017 (“EO 14017”) establishing a wide-ranging evaluation of America’s supply chains that will take place over the next twelve months. This post provides updates with respect to two of the 100-day supply-chain specific reviews.

As previously reported, the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry

On February 24, 2021, President Biden issued Executive Order 14017 (“EO 14017”) establishing a wide-ranging evaluation of America’s supply chains that will take place over the next twelve months.  The assessment will follow two tracks.

The first is a 100-day review involving four specific supply chains:

  • semiconductors and advanced packaging;
  • high-capacity batteries;
  • critical minerals and

Late yesterday evening, President Trump declared a national emergency concerning the United States reliance on imports of certain “critical minerals.” The Executive Order directs a number of federal agencies, to take certain actions in the coming weeks and months to address what the order describes as “undue reliance on critical minerals” imported from “foreign adversaries.”

On June 3, 2020, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s (“Commerce”) Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) published notice in the Federal Register of its initiation of an investigation to determine whether imports of vanadium threaten to impair the national security.  According to a press release, Commerce is initiating the investigation based on a petition filed on November 19, 2019 by two U.S. producers of vanadium — AMG Vanadium LLC, and U.S. Vanadium LLC.

Vanadium is a metallic element often used as an alloying agent in the production of steel and other metals.  It is used to improve the resulting metal’s hardness, ductility, and toughness. Typical end uses for vanadium-alloyed steels include armor plates, parts of jet engines, and cutting tools.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, vanadium is mined mostly in Brazil, China, Russia, and South Africa.  Vanadium can also be produced through a secondary process.  This source also indicates that from 2015-2018, U.S. demand was supplied 100 percent by imports.
Continue Reading Commerce Department Set to Investigate Whether Imports of Vanadium Threaten to Impair National Security

Yesterday, the U.S. International Trade Commission (“USITC”) released a report on imports of products known to be related to the response to COVID-19.  The report was requested by Congressman Richard E. Neal, Chairman of the House Committee on Ways and Means and Senator Charles E. Grassley, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Finance in early

On February 27, 2020, President Trump announced that he would not impose duties on imports of titanium sponge pursuant to his authority under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, a statute that allows for the imposition of duties where imports threaten to impair the national security.  The decision was well-received by much