Last Friday, on the anniversary of the Ukraine invasion, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) took significant action by imposing sanctions against the Russian economy, targeting Russia’s financial services sector, sanctions evasion networks, military supply chains, and metals and mining sector.  The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and

The Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) recently announced a settlement agreement with Danfoss A/S (“Danfoss” or “the company”) in response to allegations that Danfoss directed its customers in Iran, Syria, and Sudan to make payments through third-party agents to Danfoss’s bank account at the branch of a U.S. financial institution located in the United

Today, the Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) added Russian oligarch Vladimir Potanin along with several of his companies to the Specially Designated Nationals (“SDN”) List.  OFAC’s action specifically targets Mr. Potanin, Interros, an investment holding company controlled by Mr. Potanin, and Rosbank, a major Russian bank owned by Interros.  U.S. persons are prohibited from

The pace of new Russia sanctions matters slowed this week, with most of the action coming out of the European Union and United Kingdom.  New measures this week included bans on imports of steel and iron products, exports of luxury goods, investments in the Russian energy sector, and dealings with oligarchs and Russian state-owned enterprises. 

Please join us for a Kelley Drye Webinar on March 29th.   “Hot Market/Cold War: Is China Your Best Customer or Your Biggest Threat?” will feature a one-hour discussion between Kelley Drye International Trade and Government Relations partner, Paul Rosenthal, and Senior International Trade/Government Relations Advisor, Bill Reinsch, moderated by International Trade

After months of deliberation, the U.S. Congress has passed the $1.2T Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which will deliver $550 billion of new federal investments in America’s infrastructure over five years.  The bipartisan bill contains $260 billion for transportation and transit investment; $90 billion for investment in clean technologies; $84 billion for water infrastructure and

On September 20, 2021, the U.S. Department of Commerce (“Commerce”) published a final rule codifying numerous changes – both substantive and procedural in nature – to certain portions of the body of regulations governing antidumping and countervailing duty proceedings.  Regulations To Improve Administration and Enforcement of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Laws, 86 Fed. Reg. 52,300 (Dep’t Commerce Sept. 20, 2021) (“Final Rule”).  The rule revisions constitute the first major overhaul of the AD/CVD regulations in over 20 years and were several years in the making.  That Commerce’s work on and ultimate implementation of these revisions spanned multiple presidential administrations is a testament to the apolitical nature of the effort and its importance to the good governance of U.S. trade laws.

Commerce first published a proposed rule in August 2020, inviting public comment and allowing 30 days for initial comments and 14 days for rebuttal submissions.  Regulations To Improve Administration and Enforcement of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Laws, 85 Fed. Reg. 49,472 (Dep’t Commerce Aug. 13, 2020) (“Proposed Rule”).  In response to the Proposed Rule, Commerce received 37 sets of comments and 17 rebuttal submissions from interested parties, including domestic producers, exporters, importers, surety companies, and foreign governments.  Given the scope and significance of the Proposed Rule most submissions were submitted on behalf of formal trade associations or informal groups of companies, or law firms, including Kelley Drye, representing the general interests of their client base and providing input based on extensive practitioner experience.

The modifications proposed and ultimately adopted by Commerce were largely expected and codified agency practice as it has developed over many years, in a number of increasingly important areas.  As Commerce explains:
Continue Reading Commerce Publishes Long-Awaited Changes to AD/CVD Regulations

Today, the Department of Defense (“DoD”) published in the Federal Register a request for comments on risks in the supply chain for strategic and critical materials. DoD’s request stems from an Executive Order signed in February by President Biden, which directed the DoD and three other federal agencies to closely examine America’s supply chains in

Thursday, October 10, 2019
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Many companies are looking for opportunities to reduce or eliminate duties on products they import.  In 2015, Congress passed legislation codifying a duty reduction process, known as the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB), that reduces duties assessed on more than a thousand imported raw materials and intermediate