On September 28, President Donald Trump announced his nomination of two Commissioners to the United States International Trade Commission.  Dennis M. Devaney of Michigan for the remainder of a nine-year term, expiring June 16, 2023 and Randolph J. Stayin of Virginia for the remainder of a nine-year term expiring June 16, 2026.

Mr. Devaney and Mr. Stayin were nominated to fill the Commissioner positions of Commissioners Kieff and Pinkert, who left the ITC earlier this year.  President Trump’s two nominations were made with the ITC operating with only four out of six Commissioners and experiencing a historically high Section 337 caseload.

Mr. Devaney has concentrated his legal practice on advising clients on international trade issues and labor and employment disputes arising in litigation, regulatory, and legislative matters. He has acted as trial counsel in arbitration hearings, represented clients in matters arising under the National Labor Relations Act, and represented employers in defense of discrimination claims and in collective bargaining agreement negotiation and administration.  His litigation experience includes representing clients before the National Labor Relations Board, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and in state and federal courts. Mr. Devaney is a former Commissioner of the U.S. International Trade Commission, Board Member of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), and General Counsel for the Federal Labor Relations Authority.

Mr. Stayin’s legal practice has focused on international trade policy and trade regulation, but also includes non-profit trade association, federal legislative, and federal regulatory law representation.  Throughout his years of practicing international trade law, he has litigated antidumping and countervailing duty investigations, sunset reviews, trademark infringement, 301 unfair trade practices, 201 safeguards, 232 national security, generalized system of preferences, export regulation, trade sanctions, anti-boycott, and U.S. Customs and Border Control enforcement issues.  He has represented clients before the International Trade Commission, the U.S. Department of Commerce, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, the Court of International Trade, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, NAFTA dispute panels, and NAFTA and Uruguay Round/WTO negotiations. In addition to practicing trade law, Mr. Stayin served as chief of staff to Senator Robert Taft, Jr. and trade advisor to the Senator for the negation of the Trade Act of 1974.